Dreams from my Father?

Dreams from my Father?

Political music in the Age of Obama isn’t all “Yes We Can” and mis-matched inaugural duets. Armond White makes a powerful case for the relevance of a certain LA-based Mancunian:

When Morrissey sang “America Is Not The World” in 2004, he begged political comparison and the provocation in Morrissey’s stump speeches/song-catalog make this leg of his Years of Refusal tour significant. It’s what keeps the new album inexhaustibly fresh. Making “Pop You Can Believe In” requires an intervention in the traditional ways of pop music culture. As always, Morrissey challenges the sentiments pop listeners are used to hearing. Songs like “You’re the One For Me, Fatty,” “The National Front Disco” and “The Father Who Must Be Killed” depart from the glib, comfortable sarcasm that typifies youth music, offering real political and social challenge.

More on Morrisey’s latest album from Armond White in the New York Press here.

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